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08/23/2017 @ 06:19 PM
 

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 Hooking Mortality

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speng5
 June 26 2017 06:53PM (Read 1507 times)  
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So this article is talking about lake trout but I have definitely seen how fragile Iowa's members of the trout family can be, especially on a hot day. Here is the article http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/outdoors/fishing/4288331-study-warm-waters-increase-lake-trout-hooking-mortality.

Got me thinking, the catch and release streams we have here, I wonder if the IDNR has ever looked into this being counter intuitive as this article kind of touches on. Like say someone catches 7 or 8 fish in a day on a catch and release stretch, and 2 or 3 die after release. (I understand to make this argument I need to know the exact mortality rates for brook/brown/rainbow trout which I do not, I am just throwing this out as food for thought) Wouldn't it in theory be better to have a limit of 2 or something? What about length limits, where do they factor in? The article I posted says a guy sorting though 10-12 fish seeking a size probably deemed conservation or table fare appropriate does more harm to a fishery than a guy who keeps 3.

Curious first off if anyone is familiar with post catch mortality on the trout species we've got here, and if anyone has heard of something like a reduced limit instead of mandated catch and release being implemented anywhere with success.


"He had bought him a good horse, and traps, and other truck that went with being a mountain man, and said good-bye to whatever life was down there below."
 
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Whip
 June 26 2017 08:05PM  
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TU has published studies on survival of released fish in warmer water and it's not great. They suggested heavy leader and catching fish as quickly as possible and releasing them right away.


 
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speng5
 June 26 2017 08:37PM  
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Granted putting on a stringer is rougher than being straight up released. But there have been times I have trout fished in the dog days of summer, played and landed a fish quickly, put in on a clip style stringer (small hole through bottom jaw flesh, not gill hole) and into a deep pool, and ive been astonished at how fast they croak.

Again putting on a stringer even in the method I did is rougher than a straight up release but its pretty apparent how fragile of a critter they are...


"He had bought him a good horse, and traps, and other truck that went with being a mountain man, and said good-bye to whatever life was down there below."
 
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northwoodsbucks
 June 26 2017 09:31PM  
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Same is true of Walleye caught deep, musky caught in warm water, lots of other examples. I suppose more still survive that way than keeping them all though.

Compared to catch two keep two thats all you get..... I dont know.


 
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gellar
 June 27 2017 07:24AM  
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In Driftless Area trout streams the water temperature is around 65 that the mortality rate goes up. The difference in Lake Trout and the Great Lakes would be bringing fish up from 80+ feet very fast pops their swim bladder. The same is true in ocean fish.


 
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munchy71
 June 27 2017 09:22AM  
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Quote by: gellar

....The difference in Lake Trout and the Great Lakes would be bringing fish up from 80+ feet very fast pops their swim bladder....



Actually most salmonids will "burp" themselves as they come up to relieve the pressure as they are brought from deep to shallow. Happens all the time when we catch them through the ice from Superior. You know they're getting close when the big bubbles start coming up your hole. This is pretty handy considering lake trout will race up 40 or 50 feet in a matter of seconds sometimes to grab prey from below. Warm water species are an entirely different story, but typically salmonids are not prone to barotrauma like warmwater species are.

http://www.seagrant.umn.edu/newsletter/2013/05/let_em_down_easy_returning_a_fish_to_deep_water.html

-Munchy


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mbchilton
 June 27 2017 11:10AM  
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Quote by: speng5

Granted putting on a stringer is rougher than being straight up released. But there have been times I have trout fished in the dog days of summer, played and landed a fish quickly, put in on a clip style stringer (small hole through bottom jaw flesh, not gill hole) and into a deep pool, and ive been astonished at how fast they croak.

Again putting on a stringer even in the method I did is rougher than a straight up release but its pretty apparent how fragile of a critter they are...



It's not just the stringer, it's the act of putting the fish on the stringer. Typically, you would squeeze the fish, remove it's slime layer, and keep it out of the water for a couple minutes during this process. Even 30 seconds out of the water on a hot summer day could kill a trout.


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djo
 June 28 2017 11:31AM  
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I often wonder about trout mortality studies. Most of the studies I have seen suggest that catch and release mortalities are in the low teen percentages when using artificial lures with single barbless hooks. While I accept that to be true for the specific studies I do wonder about those types of numbers. I have spent a lot of time for example on Spring Branch Creek in Manchester. This is a tiny, shallow, clear spring creek that is pretty much exclusively catch and release. In the good old days it was not unusual to catch a couple of dozen fish in a day or often quite a few more. Give the predicted mortality I alone should have generated a half dozen dead trout that day and the other fisherman should have done the same resulting in scores of dead trout daily. But it is very rare to see a dead fish in the stream and in that tiny clear stream you certainly would see them. So you catch a fish on a barbless fly, work to play the fish in quickly, slip the hook out moving the fish out of the water and make sure it is revived before releasing it - I just do not see that this is killing all that many fish. I may be wrong but ???

You pull a trout out and put it on a stringer and I would not be at all surprised if it was dead in five minutes.

David


 
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speng5
 June 28 2017 01:13PM  
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Quote by: djo

I often wonder about trout mortality studies. Most of the studies I have seen suggest that catch and release mortalities are in the low teen percentages when using artificial lures with single barbless hooks. While I accept that to be true for the specific studies I do wonder about those types of numbers. I have spent a lot of time for example on Spring Branch Creek in Manchester. This is a tiny, shallow, clear spring creek that is pretty much exclusively catch and release. In the good old days it was not unusual to catch a couple of dozen fish in a day or often quite a few more. Give the predicted mortality I alone should have generated a half dozen dead trout that day and the other fisherman should have done the same resulting in scores of dead trout daily. But it is very rare to see a dead fish in the stream and in that tiny clear stream you certainly would see them. So you catch a fish on a barbless fly, work to play the fish in quickly, slip the hook out moving the fish out of the water and make sure it is revived before releasing it - I just do not see that this is killing all that many fish. I may be wrong but ???

You pull a trout out and put it on a stringer and I would not be at all surprised if it was dead in five minutes.

David



I'd agree that a single, barbless hook, coupled with a quick and gentle water release (unhooked while cradled in a net) wouldn't lead to a bunch of dead trout. My concern would more be streams listed as "artificial only" or "catch and release", not explicitly "single barbless hooks only." For example's sake let's say someone goes out there with a Mepps spinner with treble hook, gets at least 2 tips embedded in the trouts mouth. After they land it the grip it look a hot dog and put a death squeeze on it, and hoist it out of the water while they jam a pliers in its mouth and root around for a while. Maybe for good measure they drop it once or twice.

I guess my question or thought is, might it be better to either legislate "single barbless hooks only" or "limit of 2 and must keep all" rather than the more intermediate restriction of catch and release? Simply because you cannot legislate the manner, speed, and gentleness of a release...


"He had bought him a good horse, and traps, and other truck that went with being a mountain man, and said good-bye to whatever life was down there below."
 
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moresnow
 July 21 2017 10:08AM  


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Not to stir the soup but..... I like the single barbless hook idea. Not that I have comitted to using them altogether. Great idea however. Something I have been contemplating often recently. White bucket brigade would suffer. To each there own.
I will have to comment that I don't see a huge amount of dead or dying trout in NE Iowa while fishing. See a few here and there. Just my experience. And I would guess I get up there as much if not more than most. Wink


 
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stick500
 August 11 2017 11:52AM  
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I don't think too many anglers would go to the trouble of fishing someplace where they only are only allowed to catch 2 fish and then stop. Is that was is being proposed here?

BTW was watching a fishing show recently and the guide was totally gill raping a lake trout. I thought well, they must be keeping it and then he lets it go. What a moron.


 
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