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10/22/2017 @ 03:56 PM
 

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 Reasonable butcher block set

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CRIA1576
 August 08 2017 11:09PM (Read 1132 times)  
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All- i'm looking for a quality and reasonably priced butcher block knife set. My budget is a couple hundred bucks, and I'm not dropping $900 for Cutco. On the flip side i'm not wasting $50 or $75 on another Chicago Cutlery or Cuisinart set. i'd really like something that I can get 15-20 years out of without the handles falling off or fighting soft crappy stainless steel.

Thoughts?


Joel Johnson
 
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revup
 August 09 2017 08:34AM  
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Check out Ontario Knife Company.
They are not SUPER high quality, but should last you a while if taken care of.


 
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CRIA1576
 August 09 2017 08:44AM  
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Thank you and I will take a peek at them.

***EDIT***

I looked at the OKC butcher block kitchen set and they are made in China. Unfortunately that puts them off the list, but thanks for the head's up.


Joel Johnson
 
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SR Dave
 August 09 2017 09:00AM  
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Quote by: CRIA1576

All- i'm looking for a quality and reasonably priced butcher block knife set. My budget is a couple hundred bucks, and I'm not dropping $900 for Cutco. On the flip side i'm not wasting $50 or $75 on another Chicago Cutlery or Cuisinart set. i'd really like something that I can get 15-20 years out of without the handles falling off or fighting soft crappy stainless steel.

Thoughts?



I have set of Chicago Cutlery that we've had for 45 years. They have served us well. What did you not like about the Chicago Cutlery knives? Just curious.


 
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llewellinsetter
 August 09 2017 09:09AM  
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J.A. Henckels Pro Series, Global Union, Wustoff Classic and Caphalon Katana Series sets are all quality knives that are "affordable". Should run in the $300 - $400 range. ONe step down in the same brand will get you in the $200 range and will mostly be cosmetic.

I put myself through college working in restaurants and most of the top chefs were partial to Wustoff/Henkel. I found Henkel's to hold their edge better but Wustoff easier to sharpen and handle. Mostly a personal preference. The Global and the Caphalon Katana have the new Asian/Industrial style that are one piece construction and are very comfortable in the hand and easy to maintain. Another option is buying one piece at a time. Sets are nice but often don't have what you want/need and have things you never use. If you have a block, build a new set based on what individual knives you like.

Go to Bed Bath and Beyond, Crate and Barrel or Williams Sonoma and handle a few options in your price range. Then check out the restaurant supply stores like Bolton and Hay or Hockenbergs to see if you can't get a better deal. BB&B and the other retailers often have 20% off coupons too.

BTW, putting your knives in the dishwasher or cutting lemons is the fastest way to ruin the steel.


And he said to them, "Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.
 
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Maverick
 August 09 2017 09:15AM  
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I've gotten about 7 years and going of good service out of my J.A. Henckels set of knives. Just make sure not to get J.A. Henckels International. That is there way of saying "Made in China". The ones that are branded as Zwilling Henckels without the International moniker are still made in Germany I believe. They are much better quality.


WARNING: The above post may contain sarcasm and/or sophisticated satire. Any psychological or emotional damage sustained by the reader is NOT the responsibility of the contributor.
 
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llewellinsetter
 August 09 2017 09:16AM  
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Quote by: SR+Dave

Quote by: CRIA1576

All- i'm looking for a quality and reasonably priced butcher block knife set. My budget is a couple hundred bucks, and I'm not dropping $900 for Cutco. On the flip side i'm not wasting $50 or $75 on another Chicago Cutlery or Cuisinart set. i'd really like something that I can get 15-20 years out of without the handles falling off or fighting soft crappy stainless steel.

Thoughts?



I have set of Chicago Cutlery that we've had for 45 years. They have served us well. What did you not like about the Chicago Cutlery knives? Just curious.



The old Chicago Cutlery is not the same as today's versions. They used to be the standard in the packing industry with good high carbon steel but the name was purchased twenty years ago or so and now the use 420 SS steel that's made in China.


And he said to them, "Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.
 
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CRIA1576
 August 09 2017 10:24AM  
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Quote by: SR+Dave
Quote by: CRIA1576
All- i'm looking for a quality and reasonably priced butcher block knife set. My budget is a couple hundred bucks, and I'm not dropping $900 for Cutco. On the flip side i'm not wasting $50 or $75 on another Chicago Cutlery or Cuisinart set. i'd really like something that I can get 15-20 years out of without the handles falling off or fighting soft crappy stainless steel.

Thoughts?



I have set of Chicago Cutlery that we've had for 45 years. They have served us well. What did you not like about the Chicago Cutlery knives? Just curious.


The old Chicago Cutlery is not the same as today's versions. They used to be the standard in the packing industry with good high carbon steel but the name was purchased twenty years ago or so and now the use 420 SS steel that's made in China.


X2 and hopefully more cutlery manufacturers bring their operations back to the US like Buck knives did a few years ago. I have on of their SV30 folders and it is a fantastic walk around knife with excellent steel and a hard razor sharp edge.

I will check out the other brands you guys mentioned as well. I do have a block and could replace piece at a time, but I am assuming (risky I know) that there is value in buying the set. I also agree that the 420 SS is absolute crap. My current set of Food Network "chef's knives" have started chunking after about 3 years of use and i only use a sharpening rod to sharpen them. PURE JUNK. Rolling Eyes

My Dad had 2 old knives that he had brought home from the turkey plant in Ellsworth back in the '60s. Those things lasted until the '90s until the handles fell off. However, by that time there was wasn't a whole lot of steel left on them. They held a fantastic edge and I wonder if they were some of the old Chicago Cutlery high carbon blades you guys mentioned.


Joel Johnson
 
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IaCraig
 August 09 2017 11:08AM  
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Interesting thread, I did not know that Chicago Cutlery went down hill. Thanks for the heads up. Many years ago that is all we used in the meat locker, and if I would have been looking I probably would have gone that route. Thanks again.


 
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zondy
 August 09 2017 06:37PM  
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There is a vendor at Saturday's Des Moines Farmers Market that sells a wide variety of kitchen knives. People that purchase them say they are excellent. I can't speak to that but they are usually set up on Court Avenue between 2nd and 3rd. Think the name is RADA cutlery.


 
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walleye warrior
 August 09 2017 08:54PM  
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if you have never seen them or used them,take a look at custom cutlery over in Marengo.
they made the leech lake knife and still do.
very good knives made locally here in Iowa,you can have them custom made with custom engraving as well.
they have an outlet store in the Amana colonies if you ever want to go see them,or check out their website.
very reasonably priced.

www.customcutlery.com/


just go to the bottom and walk out
 
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TrapCyclone
 August 10 2017 03:14PM  
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Quote by: llewellinsetter

BTW, putting your knives in the dishwasher or cutting lemons is the fastest way to ruin the steel.

Do you know how it ruins the steel? I've heard not to put good quality knives in the dishwasher, but the reasoning for not doing so isn't clear.


Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem (I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery). -- Thomas Jefferson
 
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Maverick
 August 10 2017 03:56PM  
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Quote by: TrapCyclone

Quote by: llewellinsetter

BTW, putting your knives in the dishwasher or cutting lemons is the fastest way to ruin the steel.

Do you know how it ruins the steel? I've heard not to put good quality knives in the dishwasher, but the reasoning for not doing so isn't clear.




I've heard it's only a half true long standing misconception. What ruins the edge by putting them in the dishwasher is not the act of the dishwasher itself but people putting them in the utensil area with other utensils. They then get moved around and bumped into other knives/forks/spoons repeatedly during the wash and rinse cycles and that will ruin the edge. If you keep them separated or on the top rack away from other dishes you are ok.

Unless of course they are wood handled. Never, ever, under any circumstances put a wood handled knife in a dishwasher that you care about.

My chef knives go on the top rack, blade up, with nothing close to them and they have survived just fine.


WARNING: The above post may contain sarcasm and/or sophisticated satire. Any psychological or emotional damage sustained by the reader is NOT the responsibility of the contributor.
 
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llewellinsetter
 August 10 2017 06:53PM  
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Quote by: TrapCyclone

Quote by: llewellinsetter

BTW, putting your knives in the dishwasher or cutting lemons is the fastest way to ruin the steel.

Do you know how it ruins the steel? I've heard not to put good quality knives in the dishwasher, but the reasoning for not doing so isn't clear.



It's not about dulling the blade it's about breaking down the steel. Dishwasher soap is a very abrasive and corrosive detergent that can react with the high carbon content steel. Over time this creates a breakdown of the steel and eventually creates rust. For $20 420 SS knives I wouldn't worry about it but when I'm paying $100+ for a high carbon chef knife I'll take one minute and wash it by hand.

From Wustoff:
A special word about dishwashers:
Technically, all W√úSTHOF knives are suitable for cleaning in the dishwasher (except knives with wooden handles). However, we recommend that you do not put your knives in the dishwasher.

Why high-quality knives do not belong in the dishwasher

Knives and cutlery are put in a basket. During the washing cycle, the blades can rub against one another or against other objects and this can damage them.
With their sharp blades, the knives can damage the plastic coating on the cutlery basket. This can lead to the formation of rust.
If the dishwasher is not switched on straight away, food remains (spices, sauces, juices) can damage the blades. Spots can form and the blades can even be damaged (corrosion).
It is important to use the correct amount of detergent and rinse aid. If you do not use the correct amounts, rust particles or localized corrosion can quickly appear.


And he said to them, "Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.
 
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kenhump
 August 10 2017 11:27PM  
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No wood or stag handles. My ex put a vintage steel and carving fork, with stag handles, in dishwasher once. Badly bleached them.
Wusthof gets my vote.


Yes, caramel corn is a veggie.
 
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