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12/14/2017 @ 10:38 PM
 

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oldstylelight
 December 06 2017 09:32AM (Read 2909 times)  
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I have never owned a rifle other than a ruger 10/22 and know nothing about them.

I am looking for recommendations for specific guns that are legal in Iowa for deer hunting for myself and possibly my son (lighter recoil?). It won't happen this year as I am eating my 1st season tag today. Frown

Something that won't break the bank, but not a piece of junk. Thoughts or suggestions? Anyone have one used? What are your thoughts on using a scope vs open sights with a rifle as such?

Thanks for any knowledge. Dave


 
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ECFirearms
 December 06 2017 09:57AM  
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Quote by: oldstylelight

I have never owned a rifle other than a ruger 10/22 and know nothing about them.

I am looking for recommendations for specific guns that are legal in Iowa for deer hunting for myself and possibly my son (lighter recoil?). It won't happen this year as I am eating my 1st season tag today. Frown

Something that won't break the bank, but not a piece of junk. Thoughts or suggestions? Anyone have one used? What are your thoughts on using a scope vs open sights with a rifle as such?

Thanks for any knowledge. Dave



Take a look at the Ruger American in 450 bushmaster, won't break the bank and a good accurate rifle for the money.



https://ruger.com/products/americanRifleRanch/specSheets/16950.html


"Second Amendment - Either you are helping pull the wagon, getting a free ride in the wagon, or trying to take away the wagon. Which one are you?" -- IAShooters
 
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JPenny
 December 06 2017 09:58AM  
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In 2001, my wife bought a Winchester '94 in .44 mag to use on a bear hunt in Canada I bought her for Christmas. It sports a 16" barrel which we found out was too short for Canadian regulations. It never got used and sat in the gun safe until now. She's out there today trying to get her first kill with that firearm. I can tell you this about that gun. It shoots like a champ. As far as the sights go, we kept the iron sights on it as she is hunting in the timber.


 
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speng5
 December 06 2017 10:00AM  
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In the same boat as you, definitely not a rifle guy myself either. Like you I've owned .22's and years ago I had a .223. Due to hardly ever using it (few times a year) I ended up selling it.

Laugh if you want but I bought a Marlin 1895 in .45-70. Reason being I want to get into reloading and I have seen in my research that .45-70 is an excellent load for reloaders and very versatile. You can down load it for youth to take deer easily and without much recoil, or you can load it hot for just about any big game there is. I figure it will be nice to have for the prospect of a bear or hog hunt sometime. I also like the availability of ammo in general. I am a poor planner and forgetful at times so its nice to shoot a round I can pick up at most any sporting goods or hardware store.

I had heard great things about the Hornady Leverevolution, so I picked up some boxes of it. I was shooting the 250 gr MonoFlex to get the feel of the gun and since I didn't know what to expect in terms of recoil I figured on trying that before moving up to 325, 350 gr or higher. The 250 was not bad at all. Way softer than any shotgun shooting a slug and this is without any recoil pad or anything. Shoots pretty flat out to well past 100 supposedly though since I have open sights for now, I never tried it out that far. I could have shot it all day and not had a sore shoulder. I am an idiot when it comes to rifles and sighting in (partially why I don't own the .223 anymore) so imagine my pleasant surprise when I was shooting a 2.5" group at about 95 yards with open sights after a couple handfuls of shots. It's a simple gun that shoots a simple round. I like simplicity in a rifle due to my inexperience.

I probably won't ever put a true scope on it but have entertained the thought of a red dot just to turn it into a real tack driver at 100 and possibly extend my range a bit further. Where and how I hunt rarely leave me a shot opportunity longer than 125 or 150 anyway so not like I'm really missing out.

Also since it is a large heavy and relatively slow moving bullet, you are most often left with a very clean wound channel without an exaggerated exit wound blowout and a ton of blood shot meat. You can eat right up to the hole in most cases. Excellent penetration especially on a deer.

Last but not least I just like the dang gun. I'm a sucker for older firearms so a Marlin lever action just seemed freakin cool and now that they are legal I have an excuse to own one Cool Price wasn't awful. I got the 1895 with a 22" barrel instead of the 1895G with the 18" barrel. I think both could be had for around $600. You move up a couple "trim packages" (i'm not sure what the levels of bells and whistles are called) and you get a nicer finish, I think some hold 10 rounds instead of mine that holds 4, etc, but the price jumps QUICK. For what I got and paid I am pleased, as it aims and points nicely and isn't ungodly heavy as far as guns go.

I dont know age/size of your son but if he can handle a shotgun or muzzy he could handle the .45-70 250 gr with ease. Maybe even the 325's. With enough range time and decent optics, and a rangefinder (unless you're real sharp at judging distance) I don't see why it couldn't be a decent 125-150 yard gun as long as you understand the drop and ballistics.

I will say if you want to become a real sharpshooter or take real long shots there are certainly better options out there.


"He had bought him a good horse, and traps, and other truck that went with being a mountain man, and said good-bye to whatever life was down there below."
 
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copperyj
 December 06 2017 10:53AM  
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I went with a T&C Prohunter with a 460 S&W 16" barrel. Leaded down this is a great combo for my 90lb son to shoot. He has 2 kills with it already. Both instant kill shots, one at 15 yds and one at 100yds. It is very light, short and with the 45-70 barrel i got for it also, i can convert the gun to use as a smokeless muzzy for my late season hunts. For us it was just a better fit for me and my son in terms of safety features and user friendliness. And surprisingly the 460 round out of this gun is very nice shooting out to about 175yrds. And if need I can also shoot 454, and 45lc.


 
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TrapCyclone
 December 06 2017 10:57AM  
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I highly recommend the Henry Big Boy series of rifles. I am not sure as to your exact price range, but you can get a Henry Big Boy in a wide range of straight walled cartridges ranging from .357 magnum to .44 magnum, and up to .45 Colt. Beautiful guns with fantastic fit and finish that are typically good shooters.

https://www.henryusa.com/rifles/henry-big-boy-steel/


Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem (I prefer dangerous freedom over peaceful slavery). -- Thomas Jefferson
 
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CRIA1576
 December 06 2017 11:59AM  
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I recently purchased a CVA Hunter break action in .44 magnum for my 10 and 12 year old daughters. The gun came scoped with a nice CVA case for $320 out the door at Bud's. The other suggestions are all very good choices as well, but you are going to struggle to even find a used Marlin, Winchester, or Henry for less than $600, and that won't include a scope in most cases.

If money wasn't a concern, I would opt for a Henry Big Boy Carbine with the large lever loop for gloves. IME .44 mag has very little recoil and my girls (10 and 12) are shooting 1" groups at 50 yards consistently with Federal 240 grain JHP off the shelf from Walmart.

The .45-70 is incredibly versatile and the .450 is also a very good round. Just depends on how much felt recoil you are comfortable with especially for young shooters.

Good luck!


Joel Johnson
 
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Mr.Seaguar
 December 06 2017 12:14PM  
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TNW ASR in 10mm. 30 round clip and hope the herd comes out of the timber right past ya. That's not what I have but it might be next year.


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maxx
 December 06 2017 01:43PM  
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How old is your kid? I would stay away from some of the larger frame rifle cartridges if you are worried about recoil and go with one of the pistol ones these guy suggested.

I never looked into a AR with a pistol cartridge. I thought about building a 450 bushmaster so the kids could use it but I stayed away because of the recoil.


There were things he could do without declared Reed. "Steaks that don't bleed. Coffee with cream. Guys who don't swear. Boots that leak. Wild animals in cages. Bears trained to do tricks. Cheese that has no smell." Jay Reed
 
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Olefart
 December 06 2017 02:23PM  
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Hopefully next year they will add more calibers to their list. IMO a rifle like the .30 carbine would be a good lite recoil, lite to carry rifle for young shooters and old men. If .44, .45acp, .357 are deemed powerful enough for deer hunting, why not the .30 carbine. In the USAs wars a lot of our enemies met their maker with that caliber. Loaded with a 110 gr soft nose or HP should be more than enough to kill a deer.


 
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IAMike
 December 06 2017 02:43PM  


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Quote by: speng5

In the same boat as you, definitely not a rifle guy myself either. Like you I've owned .22's and years ago I had a .223. Due to hardly ever using it (few times a year) I ended up selling it.

Laugh if you want but I bought a Marlin 1895 in .45-70. Reason being I want to get into reloading and I have seen in my research that .45-70 is an excellent load for reloaders and very versatile. You can down load it for youth to take deer easily and without much recoil, or you can load it hot for just about any big game there is. I figure it will be nice to have for the prospect of a bear or hog hunt sometime. I also like the availability of ammo in general. I am a poor planner and forgetful at times so its nice to shoot a round I can pick up at most any sporting goods or hardware store.

I had heard great things about the Hornady Leverevolution, so I picked up some boxes of it. I was shooting the 250 gr MonoFlex to get the feel of the gun and since I didn't know what to expect in
terms of recoil I figured on trying that before moving up to 325, 350 gr or higher. The 250 was not bad at all. Way softer than any shotgun shooting a slug and this is without any recoil pad or anything. Shoots pretty flat out to well past 100 supposedly though since I have open sights for now, I never tried it out that far. I could have shot it all day and not had a sore shoulder. I am an idiot when it comes to rifles and sighting in (partially why I don't own the .223 anymore) so imagine my pleasant surprise when I was shooting a 2.5" group at about 95 yards with open sights after a couple handfuls of shots. It's a simple gun that shoots a simple round. I like simplicity in a rifle due to my inexperience.

I probably won't ever put a true scope on it but have entertained the thought of a red dot just to turn it into a real tack driver at 100 and possibly extend my range a bit further. Where and how I hunt rarely leave me a shot opportunity longer than 125 or 150 anyway so not like I'm really missing out.

Also since it is a large heavy and relatively slow moving bullet, you are most often left with a very clean wound channel without an exaggerated exit wound blowout and a ton of blood shot meat. You can eat right up to the hole in most cases. Excellent penetration especially on a deer.

Last but not least I just like the dang gun. I'm a sucker for older firearms so a Marlin lever action just seemed freakin cool and now that they are legal I have an excuse to own one Cool Price wasn't awful. I got the 1895 with a 22" barrel instead of the 1895G with the 18" barrel. I think both could be had for around $600. You move up a couple "trim packages" (i'm not sure what the levels of bells and whistles are called) and you get a nicer finish, I think some hold 10 rounds instead of mine that holds 4, etc, but the price jumps QUICK. For what I got and paid I am pleased, as it aims and points nicely and isn't ungodly heavy as far as guns go.

I dont know age/size of your son but if he can handle a shotgun or muzzy he could handle the .45-70 250 gr with ease. Maybe even the 325's. With enough range time and decent optics, and a rangefinder (unless you're real sharp at judging distance) I don't see why it couldn't be a decent 125-150 yard gun as long as you understand the drop and ballistics.

I will say if you want to become a real sharpshooter or take real long shots there are certainly better options out there.





To my understanding a 250 grain bullet would have the same recoil as a 400 grain bullet because the have the same powder charge. The grain refers to the bullet size. Someone please correct me if I’m wrong.


 
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CRIA1576
 December 06 2017 02:51PM  
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My 12 year old daughter is petite (95 pounds) and has carried a 20 gauge Mossberg Bantam for a couple seasons. According to her the .44mag kicks less than half as much as her 20. My 10 year old daughter hadn't shot anything but .22 before we began practicing with the .44mag, and she said it barely kicked too. She says the 20 kicks a lot.

IAMike- given the same powder charge, as bullet weight increases so does case pressure, increasing felt recoil. In other words, all things being equal, big heavy bullets will kick more than lighter bullets.


Joel Johnson
 
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ECFirearms
 December 06 2017 03:21PM  
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Quote by: maxx

How old is your kid? I would stay away from some of the larger frame rifle cartridges if you are worried about recoil and go with one of the pistol ones these guy suggested.

I never looked into a AR with a pistol cartridge. I thought about building a 450 bushmaster so the kids could use it but I stayed away because of the recoil.



My AR-15 in 450 bushmaster with muzzle brake has very little recoil and by hunting season next year it will suppressed. with the added benefit of more range than a 44mag and adjustable stock for a shorter reach if needed.


"Second Amendment - Either you are helping pull the wagon, getting a free ride in the wagon, or trying to take away the wagon. Which one are you?" -- IAShooters
 
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speng5
 December 06 2017 03:38PM  
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Quote by: IAMike

Quote by: speng5

In the same boat as you, definitely not a rifle guy myself either. Like you I've owned .22's and years ago I had a .223. Due to hardly ever using it (few times a year) I ended up selling it.

Laugh if you want but I bought a Marlin 1895 in .45-70. Reason being I want to get into reloading and I have seen in my research that .45-70 is an excellent load for reloaders and very versatile. You can down load it for youth to take deer easily and without much recoil, or you can load it hot for just about any big game there is. I figure it will be nice to have for the prospect of a bear or hog hunt sometime. I also like the availability of ammo in general. I am a poor planner and forgetful at times so its nice to shoot a round I can pick up at most any sporting goods or hardware store.

I had heard great things about the Hornady Leverevolution, so I picked up some boxes of it. I was shooting the 250 gr MonoFlex to get the feel of the gun and since I didn't know what to expect in
terms of recoil I figured on trying that before moving up to 325, 350 gr or higher. The 250 was not bad at all. Way softer than any shotgun shooting a slug and this is without any recoil pad or anything. Shoots pretty flat out to well past 100 supposedly though since I have open sights for now, I never tried it out that far. I could have shot it all day and not had a sore shoulder. I am an idiot when it comes to rifles and sighting in (partially why I don't own the .223 anymore) so imagine my pleasant surprise when I was shooting a 2.5" group at about 95 yards with open sights after a couple handfuls of shots. It's a simple gun that shoots a simple round. I like simplicity in a rifle due to my inexperience.

I probably won't ever put a true scope on it but have entertained the thought of a red dot just to turn it into a real tack driver at 100 and possibly extend my range a bit further. Where and how I hunt rarely leave me a shot opportunity longer than 125 or 150 anyway so not like I'm really missing out.

Also since it is a large heavy and relatively slow moving bullet, you are most often left with a very clean wound channel without an exaggerated exit wound blowout and a ton of blood shot meat. You can eat right up to the hole in most cases. Excellent penetration especially on a deer.

Last but not least I just like the dang gun. I'm a sucker for older firearms so a Marlin lever action just seemed freakin cool and now that they are legal I have an excuse to own one Cool Price wasn't awful. I got the 1895 with a 22" barrel instead of the 1895G with the 18" barrel. I think both could be had for around $600. You move up a couple "trim packages" (i'm not sure what the levels of bells and whistles are called) and you get a nicer finish, I think some hold 10 rounds instead of mine that holds 4, etc, but the price jumps QUICK. For what I got and paid I am pleased, as it aims and points nicely and isn't ungodly heavy as far as guns go.

I dont know age/size of your son but if he can handle a shotgun or muzzy he could handle the .45-70 250 gr with ease. Maybe even the 325's. With enough range time and decent optics, and a rangefinder (unless you're real sharp at judging distance) I don't see why it couldn't be a decent 125-150 yard gun as long as you understand the drop and ballistics.

I will say if you want to become a real sharpshooter or take real long shots there are certainly better options out there.





To my understanding a 250 grain bullet would have the same recoil as a 400 grain bullet because the have the same powder charge. The grain refers to the bullet size. Someone please correct me if I�m wrong.



That is true although for the ammo choices I was looking at (granted the place I was only had like 2 choices of bullet and one choice between those of grain), the packaging indicated the 350 and higher grains had a higher velocity out the muzzle and less drop downrange. At the time I assumed that was due to a different powder charge? But I could very well be wrong on that. I assumed to get a heavier round traveling faster with less drop at the same range it would take more powder, which I did attribute to recoil. Again maybe that isn't what is making the difference.


"He had bought him a good horse, and traps, and other truck that went with being a mountain man, and said good-bye to whatever life was down there below."
 
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maxx
 December 06 2017 03:54PM  
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Quote by: ECFirearms

Quote by: maxx

How old is your kid? I would stay away from some of the larger frame rifle cartridges if you are worried about recoil and go with one of the pistol ones these guy suggested.

I never looked into a AR with a pistol cartridge. I thought about building a 450 bushmaster so the kids could use it but I stayed away because of the recoil.



My AR-15 in 450 bushmaster with muzzle brake has very little recoil and by hunting season next year it will suppressed. with the added benefit of more range than a 44mag and adjustable stock for a shorter reach if needed.



See that goes against what I have read. I would like to try it.

Really don't have a need for one but have the itch to build another AR.


There were things he could do without declared Reed. "Steaks that don't bleed. Coffee with cream. Guys who don't swear. Boots that leak. Wild animals in cages. Bears trained to do tricks. Cheese that has no smell." Jay Reed
 
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kenhump
 December 06 2017 04:58PM  
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My choice would be a Marlin 1894s in .41 mag. Awesome cartridge. I have owned 2 revolvers in .41 mag and .44 mag. .41 hands down better round.


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oldstylelight
 December 06 2017 05:28PM  
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Quote by: CRIA1576

I recently purchased a CVA Hunter break action in .44 magnum for my 10 and 12 year old daughters. The gun came scoped with a nice CVA case for $320 out the door at Bud's. The other suggestions are all very good choices as well, but you are going to struggle to even find a used Marlin, Winchester, or Henry for less than $600, and that won't include a scope in most cases.

If money wasn't a concern, I would opt for a Henry Big Boy Carbine with the large lever loop for gloves. IME .44 mag has very little recoil and my girls (10 and 12) are shooting 1" groups at 50 yards consistently with Federal 240 grain JHP off the shelf from Walmart.

The .45-70 is incredibly versatile and the .450 is also a very good round. Just depends on how much felt recoil you are comfortable with especially for young shooters.

Good luck!




For the money, that seems like a great option. Why are the other rifles double the price? Is this gun you bought a break action like a shotgun break action being a single shot? I am going to look around locally for a little bit and probably will "pull the trigger" sometime in the near future for next years deer gun.


 
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CRIA1576
 December 06 2017 06:59PM  
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The other rifles mentioned are repeaters- either lever action or AR platform. You can also find bolt-guns in these calibers and the Ruger 96 was a lever gun based on the 10/22 design that was chambered in .44 mag and .357 if I recall.

The CVA Hunter is a break-action single shot. The action is opened by pushing a button on the front of the trigger guard. It has a hammer with an ambidextrous spur extension that can be flipped for left and right handed shooters. There are several models to choose from including .45-70, .450 Bushmaster, .44 Magnum, etc...

Check out this page:

https://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/advanced_search_result.php?keywords=CVA+Hunter


Joel Johnson
 
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outdoorsron
 December 06 2017 07:26PM  
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Hello: In my opinion the ar platform rifles are not for beginners . I would go with the 45-70 cartridge. Stay away from the hotter loads like the Leverloutions and recoil is light. A lot of people claim the recoil is bad but most have never fired a 45-70 . I shoot a Thompson Center Contender pistol in 45-70 no problems. Good Luck. O - R


 
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IowaSportsmanGuy
 December 06 2017 07:55PM  


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Quote by: Olefart

Hopefully next year they will add more calibers to their list. IMO a rifle like the .30 carbine would be a good lite recoil, lite to carry rifle for young shooters and old men. If .44, .45acp, .357 are deemed powerful enough for deer hunting, why not the .30 carbine. In the USAs wars a lot of our enemies met their maker with that caliber. Loaded with a 110 gr soft nose or HP should be more than enough to kill a deer.

Allowing calibers below .357 is unlikely. The DNR officer I asked said they are staying away from 9mm (at .355). Yes, the 30 carbine has taken thousands of deer ethically. Remember that they are using pistol laws which only require a 4" barrel.


 
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